KEYNOTE ADDRESS

CONFERENCE DAY 1

Ben Goldstein

15:10-16:00

Ben Goldstein is a teacher, teacher trainer, materials writer and international conference speaker. He has taught English for over twenty-five years in the UK, Spain and Hong Kong. He currently teaches on The New School’s online MATESOL program (New York). He has co-authored the secondary coursebook series Eyes Open and the adult series English Unlimited and Evolve as well as the teachers’ methodology handbooks. Working with Images and Language Learning with Digital Video – all published by Cambridge University Press. His main interests lie in intercultural and identity issues, visual literacy and English as an International Language.

Questions of Identity
50 min including Q&A
Abstract 
The acquisition of a new language raises questions of subjectivity and desire, the problems confronted by the learner are not just technical or mechanical but involve complex issues of identity: “Who am I when I speak this language?” or alternatively “can I be me when I speak it?”. This talk looks at learner autobiographies and analyses how students can be empowered to find a personal space, where they can fashion their own voice and claim their right to speak. 

Prof. Jasmin Cowin

16:00-17:00

Assistant Professor for TESOL/Bilingual Programs at Touro College, GSE. Her ongoing research in the field of TESOL and language acquisition is expressed in through publications, presentations and participation in academic conferences and scholarly activities with a emphasis on Augmented Reality Digital Technologies and SLA focusing on practical applications and use cases for educators.

Cultivating Innovation through Augmented Reality Digital Technologies

This tech presentation concentrates on Augmented Reality Digital Technologies such as Augmented Reality (AR), Virtual Reality (VR) and MR (Mixed Reality) mobile language learning and practical considerations creating inclusive experiences for language instruction in innovative environments.   The presentation will present Augmented Reality Digital Technologies (ARDT) with a focus on the following current trends at the forefront of ENL/ESL teaching and training simulations. The quest for exceptional immersive learning spaces requires TESOL faculty to become familiar and comfortable in Virtual Worlds (VW) and 3 D environments. Ultimately, TESOL faculty will need mastery in designing and creating authentic virtual learning environments.

Dr. Linda Bradford

17:10-18:00

A life-long educator. She received her undergraduate degree in Elementary Education and taught in the L.A. City School District. After living for 7 years in California, the family moved to Utah at which time Linda went back to school and earned her Masters in Art Education in 2002 ‘With Distinction’. This is an honor that has been given only twice in 20 years from the Heads of the BYU Visual Arts Department. She taught Art at Brigham Young University for 11 years. In 2012, after 5 years of full time courses and dissertation work, she received her PhD from BYU.

The Role of 3D Learning in Higher Education: Advantages and Disadvantages in the Global Academic Context

The definition of educational technology and its application has changed together with the landscape of immersive learning space. In the 1990s the Internet pioneered elements of innovation through the use of technologies for education with an exponential growth trajectory centering around student experience, classroom management and assessment. The expansion of VR and AR technology into virtual education spaces has the potential to foster learning through simulations, digital kiosks, live virtual events, live interactivity, AI-driven robots, instructor-facilitated learning and hyper-realistic experiences.

WORKSHOPS

CONFERENCE DAY 2

Olga Malova

10:00-11:00

Irina Malova, Ph.D., is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Foreign Languages at NUST MISIS. Her research focuses on literacy instruction and literacy development for emergent bilinguals. Specifically, she investigates integrated reading-writing instruction for emergent bilinguals as an approach for writing instruction by exploring video observations of writing instruction, teachers’ perspectives towards this approach, and features of critical knowledge. Her previous research includes exploring the vocabulary directives in Teacher Guides, multimodal representations of vocabulary, and multilingual education in Russia. 

Metacognitive Strategies: Text Deconstruction
This workshop focuses on the text deconstruction as a metacognitive strategy. This approach stems from the recent theories of second language acquisition that propose a view on language learning with the emphasis on form and meaning (Lightbown & Spada, 2013). According to functional grammar perspective, language is a meaning-making resource by means of which people interact in the social world (Halliday, 1978, 1994). Thus, there is an important metalanguage, which enables learners to connect meaning with the form in such a way that promotes second language learning. The presenter will guide the audience through the pedagogical framework of grammar teaching and learning – unpacking written language (Gibbons, 2006a; de Oliveira & Schleppegrell, 2015). By using it, teachers and learners will be able to deconstruct written text, make sense of academic language, and recognize certain language choices for particular purposes. 

Denis Kalitin

10:00-11:00

Associate professor at the department of computer-aided design and engineering design in NUST MISIS. He has taught discrete mathematics, artificial neural networks, development of intelligent software systems for over twenty years. Nowadays he has an interest in finding an unusual application of artificial neural networks in different human activities.

What is Artificial Intelligence and how we can use AI in learning?
Different scientists view artificial intelligence in different ways. There are many definitions, applications and limitations. But what exactly is Artificial Intelligence? We will focus on general theory, provide clear examples and review common approaches for building AI. The presentation is aimed at teachers of English and Humanities.

 

Ben Goldstein

11:00-12:15

Ben Goldstein is a teacher, teacher trainer, materials writer and international conference speaker. He has taught English for over twenty-five years in the UK, Spain and Hong Kong. He currently teaches on The New School’s online MATESOL program (New York). He has co-authored the secondary coursebook series Eyes Open and the adult series English Unlimited and Evolve as well as the teachers’ methodology handbooks. Working with Images and Language Learning with Digital Video – all published by Cambridge University Press. His main interests lie in intercultural and identity issues, visual literacy and English as an International Language.

Uncovering Culture
Abstract 
Intercultural awareness and plurilingualism are central concerns of the Common European Framework, challenging the way ‘target culture’ is traditionally treated in ELT materials. This practical talk looks at research into learner autobiographies and the conclusions that can be drawn from students’ observations about their own language learning. It promotes the use of global and local topics and learner-generated tasks in which students are encouraged to seek out a space where they can fashion their own voice and vision of English.

Polina Ermakova

12:15-13:00

An associate professor at the Department of Foreign Languages and Communication, and Academic Coordinator of the English Language programme for Bachelor Degree students at National University of Science and Technology ‘MISiS’, Moscow. She supervises academic affairs such as academic maintenance of the language programme, teacher development and syllabus design. Her key responsibility is to create genuine educational environment for teaching and learning. Her research interests focus on critical thinking and essay writing in EAP. She is also a holder of the TEFL certificate.

Talk “Exploring Ways of Communicating Data”